Fractured

Hair tied back, breeze ruffling her dress,
she receives the morning rays
like a first kiss.

August almost done, bushes bear their berries;
it is a season of plenty.  Time
has little touched this land.

Stones glisten along the marshy bank
as if the river were their mother,
and they too wise to stray.

Irreverent to think of leaving and yet,
the thought was there, not for the stones
but for the girl.

She hears the trucks roaring in the distance,
There will be no picks and shovels
in this merciless mission,

More brutal far, this ravaging of Earth,
this fracturing that brought in
rougher men,

Strangers with no ties to the land,
bonuses for production,  the rumble
grows ever louder.

Her long thin fingers gentle a berry
from its stem.  Tomorrow these bushes
will be gone.

The lease has been signed.

 

Proponents of hydraulic fracturing point to the economic benefits from the vast amounts of formerly inaccessible hydrocarbons the process can extract.  Opponents point to potential environmental impacts, including contamination of ground water, depletion of fresh water, risks to air quality, the migration of gases and hydraulic fracturing chemicals to the surface, surface contamination from spills and flow-back, and the health effects of these. For these reasons hydraulic fracturing has come under international scrutiny, with some countries suspending or banning it. The practice of injecting water into deep rock formations causes earthquakes, both the U.S. Army and the U.S. Geological Survey have concluded.

8 thoughts on “Fractured

  1. Sarah,

    Fractured beyond repair.. such a beautiful poem with such a bleak outcome in the near future. When will it ever stop, this destruction of our planet?

    As always.
    Francina

  2. BoardFlak

    An elegant poem, Sarah. The problem is that the genie is out of the bottle and companies rarely let “minor considerations” like the environment get in their way.

  3. “companies rarely let “minor considerations” like the environment get in their way.”

    So sadly true, Michael.

    My thanks for the visit and for your continued support of my work.

    Sarah

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